The 5 Pillars of Employee Behavior Change: Pillar #4

By Melissa Suzuno Nov 1, 2017 8:00:00 AM

You have high hopes for your employee wellbeing program—you’re going to motivate and inspire your employees to eat healthier, exercise more, quit smoking… well, the list goes on and on. And while you may have good intentions, if you’re like the majority of HR and benefits leaders, you’ve probably seen a bit of a gap between your hopes and reality. It can be hard to get the numbers you’d like to see for enrollment and participation—not to mention lasting engagement and long-term behavior change.

Part of the problem is that many programs neglect the science of behavior change, which minimizes their chances of long-term success.

In this series, we’ll explore the five pillars of behavior change that will help you design an effective employee wellbeing program. You can find the posts on Pillar #1 here, Pillar #2 here, and Pillar #3 here.

The fourth pillar focuses on taking a person-centered approach to wellbeing. Read on to explore this concept in more detail!

Person-Centered Therapy vs. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: What’s the Difference?

By Julia Miller Sep 27, 2017 8:00:00 AM

 

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably struggled with some sort of behavior change, like exercising more regularly, better managing stress, or eating more healthfully. There are many benefits to working with someone else, whether it’s a therapist, counselor, or coach. While there is a relational quality to all types of counseling (a client/patient must want to talk and share with their therapist, after all!), approaches come in all shapes and sizes.

Person-centered therapy (PCT) is based on a foundation of empathy, unconditional positive regard, and authenticity. It assumes that people are naturally inclined toward positive growth and that they have a great capacity for self understanding and modifying their behavior and attitudes, given the right environment/climate/support.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), on the other hand, is based on the assumption that most problems are a result of negative thoughts, which means that existing cognitive patterns must be altered in order to move past emotional or behavioral issues.

To help bring these definitions to life, below are two similar conversations, one that uses the PCT approach we favor here at LifeDojo, and one that uses a CBT approach.

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Lifedojo solves the employer’s crisis of under-utilized disease management, behavioral health and well-being benefits through an all-encompassing employee behavior change engine.

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